2013 press releases

press release

 

the Bridport Prize

 

THE INTERNATIONAL WRITING COMPETITION ANNOUNCES THE WINNERS

 

 Judged by Wendy Cope OBEMichèle Roberts and David Swann


 

"Mention the Bridport Prize and the eyes of writers everywhere light up. It's not just the money - though that's not to be sneezed at - it’s a prize really worth fighting for in terms of prestige and genuine literary accomplishment.'”  

 

Fay Weldon, patron

 

 

 

            Daisy Behagg wins the £5,000 first prize for poetry

 

            Eve Thomson wins the £5,000 first prize for short story 

 

            Nicholas Ruddock wins £1,000 first prize for flash fiction

 

 

 

Judging the poetry entries, poet Wendy Cope said: “I found that certain poems came to mind when I was going about my everyday business or just sitting quietly with a cup of tea. They were memorable. I enjoyed thinking about them and looked forward to reading them again.”

 

Awarding Daisy Behagg from Bristol the first prize of £5,000 for her poem ‘The Opposite of Dave’, Wendy Cope said, ‘‘The Opposite of Dave’ made me laugh out loud the first time I read it and smile every time I thought of it. They say that funny poems don’t win competitions. Well, this one did. But it isn’t just a funny poem. It is saying something about women and their relationships with men that many readers will find recognisable. It builds up very well to its surprise ending. You start off believing that the author is praising Dave’s successor. You begin to think he doesn’t sound all that great. Does she really rate this guy? And then you get the laugh.”

 

Second prize of £1,000 was awarded to Mary Woodward from St Albans, and the third prize of £500 went to Stephen Santus of Oxford. 

 

 

 

Author Michèle Roberts judging the short story category said, “I admired and enjoyed many of the stories. The best of them suggested that the writer had got close to her or his subject, lived with it for a bit, let it ferment for a while, been so affected by it that they had necessarily invented a new short story form, new arrangements of language, found the best possible narrative perspective whether close up or further away.”

 

Michèle Roberts chose ‘A Man in Three Moments’ by Eve Thomson from Edinburgh, for the first prize, winning the writer  £5,000; Kerry Hood from Bristol, won the second prize of £1,000 and the third prize of £500 was awarded to Sheila Crawford of Hexham, Northumberland.

 

Michèle Roberts said, “The top three prizewinners were easy to pick. Their stories stood out immediately, characterized first and foremost by energetic, inventive language, and also by a subtle take on subject matter and themes. ‘A Man in Three Moments’ by Eve Thomson brilliantly telescoped time and dealt with the mysterious meanings of the word ‘beauty’. ‘TXL’ by Kerry Hood embodied pain, difficulty, triumph and humour. ‘Oyster Woman’ by Sheila Crawford evoked trauma through reticence and understatement.”

 

 

 

Judging the flash fiction category, David Swann, awarded first prize of £1,000 to Nicholas Ruddock of Ontario, Canada, for his story ‘Polio.’

 

David Swann said, “Like all good literature, flash fiction tends to lose its fizz when reduced to jokes or anecdotes. And it can be cruel towards over-compression and gimmicks. But the 50 writers on this year’s shortlist prove what a flexible and fascinating form the micro-story remains. As well as supernatural yarns, contemporary Zen koans, and urban folk tales, I read pieces that used surrealism, magic realism, and comedy. Some of the pieces limited themselves to individual scenes, and others roamed around through time and space. Many of the stories found mystery in commonplace props and places, while others dug into rich and rewarding characters. And in the best experimental pieces, writers opened up a fascinating third space, located somewhere between fiction and poetry.”

 

Second prize of £500 for flash fiction went to Michelle Wright of Australia and the £250 third prize was awarded to Sarah Baxter of Colchester, Essex.

 

 

 

Highly Commended prizes for poetry were won by Virginia Astley, Richard Berengarten, Lisa Brockwell, Julian Broughton, Jenny Danes, Sallie Durham, Emily Goldman, Doreen Gurrey, Lorn Macintyre and Shirley Waite.

 

 

 

Highly Commended prizes for short story were won by Dima Alzayat, Benjamin Dipple, Barry Lee Thompson, Marinella Mezzanotte, Manus McManus, Jennifer Mills, John Murphy, Mai Nardone, Noel O’Regan and Rebecca Swirsky.

 

 

 

Highly Commended prizes for flash fiction were won by Josephine Rowe, Paul Stephenson and David Steward.

 

 

 

Judging The Bridport Prize 2014 competition is Liz Lochhead for poetry, Andrew Miller for short stories and Tania Hershman for flash fiction.

 

 

 

Entry forms for The Bridport Prize 2014 are available in January from The Bridport Prize, PO Box 6910, Bridport DT6 9BQ, UK (send an SASE).  Alternatively, you can enter online from November at www.bridportprize.org.uk

 

 

 

Ends

 

 

 

For more information, please contact Frances Everitt. 

 

Jpeg photographs available

 

Tel:  0044 (0) 1308 459963                      

 

Email: frances@bridportprize.org.uk

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Peggy Chapman-Andrews

It was with great sadness that we learned last week of the death of Peggy Chapman-Andrews.  Peggy was one of the founders of Bridport Arts Centre, almost 40 years ago in 1973, when the then ‘Arts Society’ of which Peggy was the secretary, purchased the old Methodist Chapel.

In the same year Peggy also founded the Bridport Prize, as a fundraiser for the Arts Centre, which has gone on to become one of the largest and most respected creative writing competitions in the country, bringing great prestige as well as financial support to Bridport.

Peggy’s contribution to the Arts Centre and the Bridport Prize over many years is beyond estimation.  She continued to visit the Arts 

Bac Signing

Centre up until last year and she always had words of encouragement (and an opinion or two on the content of the programme!).  We will all miss her presence and send our condolences to her family.

Polly Gifford (Director) and all the staff and Trustees of Bridport Arts Centre

Frances Everitt, (Prize Administrator), the BP team and all the readers and volunteers

 

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Press release January 2013

The Bridport Prize 2013 

Fay Weldon CBE, Novelist and Bridport Prize Patron:

“Mention the Bridport Prize and the eyes of writers everywhere light up. It’s not just the money – though that’s not to be sneezed at – it’s a prize really worth fighting for in terms of prestige and genuine literary accomplishment.”

2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Bridport Prize international writing competition, set up by the redoubtable Peggy Chapman-Andrews in order to raise funds for Bridport Arts Centre.  Since those early days in the 1970s the competition has grown enormously and is now considered one of the most prestigious open writing awards in the UK.  With a £5000 first prize for a short story (of up to 5000 words); and £5000 first prize for a poem (of up to 42 lines) it is also one of the richest in terms of prize money. There is £1,000 to be won for the best short, short story of under 250 words, in the new category of Flash Fiction.

We are delighted to announce our eminent judges for 2013:  Wendy Cope for poetry, Michèle Roberts for short stories and David Swann for flash fiction.

Continuing the course Peggy C-A set in action all those years ago, last week prize administrator, Frances Everitt, and a band of some 20 volunteers, mailed out 150,000 entry forms to organisations and individuals in the UK and around the world.  Among those volunteers are some who have been helping with the prize for over 25 years:  Ken Garrard was among the all male crew who did all the heavy work counting and packing boxes of 500’s and 1,000’s leaflets – sent to libraries and other large organisations.  Peggy supplied refreshment and a large tin of Quality Street to keep everyone going!   Sandra Brown also recalls Peggy nabbing her friends whenever they went on holiday:  ‘where are you going, here are some leaflets to distribute’!  Jon Wyatt, the lead short story reader, has been involved since 1982 when there were 600 entries in total (nowadays it’s around 16,000).  He recalls stories from 20 or 30 years ago that didn't win a prize but that he shall never forget. He says: ‘so those anonymous writers have a profound and lasting effect on a reader, only they will never have known that, and perhaps - since writer's egos are often fragile - not continued writing; but, if they had, who's to say that they might not have persevered and found success.  Keep trying is the motto of that, I suppose.’  

In the Internet age, the number of stories and poems entered through the BP website has risen tremendously.  We have just sent out a newsletter to our thousands strong database and in the last 24 hours have had 70 new entries, 300 new facebook ‘likes’ and 250 new twitter ‘followers’.  Why not join us?!  You can find us here:

Website:                        http://www.bridportprize.org.uk/

Facebook page:           http://www.facebook.com/bridportprize

Twitter:                          https://twitter.com/BridportPrize

Anyone can enter – so long as the work is previously unpublished. It costs £8 per story, £7 per poem or £6 per flash fiction and the closing date is 31st May 2013. Entries can be made by post or online.

Postal entry forms are available online or by sending an SAE to: The Bridport Prize, PO Box 6910, Dorset DT6 9BQ, UK

The Anthology of the 33 winning stories and poems of 2012, plus judges reports, is now available online or from the above address for £12 (inc UK post, or £15 inc overseas post).

ENDS


For more information contact Frances Everitt, tel: 01308 428333 or email frances@bridportprize.org.uk


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Press release January 2013

 

The Bridport Prize 2013       

Fay Weldon CBE, Novelist and Bridport Prize Patron:

“Mention the Bridport Prize and the eyes of writers everywhere light up. It’s not just the money – though that’s not to be sneezed at – it’s a prize really worth fighting for in terms of prestige and genuine literary accomplishment.”

 

The Bridport Prize is one of the most prestigious open writing competitions in the English language – with £5000 first prize for a short story (of up to 5000 words); and £5000 first prize for a poem (of up to 42 lines). The category of Flash Fiction attracts a first prize of £1,000 to be won for the best short, short story of under 250 words.

The Bridport is also known as a tremendous literary stepping-stone – the first step in the careers of writers such as Kate Atkinson, Tobias Hill, Carol Ann Duffy and Helen Dunmore.

Anyone can enter – so long as the work is previously unpublished. It costs £8 per story, £7 per poem or £6 per flash fiction and the closing date is 31st May 2013. Entries can be made by post or online:

      www.bridportprize.org.uk

Postal entry forms are available online or by sending an SAE to: The Bridport Prize, PO Box 6910, Dorset DT6 9BQ, UK

This year’s judges are Wendy Cope for poetry, Michèle Roberts for short stories and David Swann for flash fiction.

The prizegiving will be during the Bridport Open Book Festival in October, in which the judges and other well known writers give readings and masterclasses, plus many other live and participatory events. Winners will be given the opportunity to participate in the Festival.

The Anthology of the 33 winning stories and poems of 2012, plus judges reports, is now available online or from the above address for £12 (inc UK post, or £15 inc overseas post).

ENDS


For more information contact Frances Everitt, tel: 01308 428333 or email frances@bridportprize.org.uk

 

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