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Kit de Waal Bursaries

Kit de Waal won first prize in the Bridport Prize flash fiction competition in 2014 and 2015. Her first novel ‘My Name is Leon’ was published in 2016, became an international bestseller and was shortlisted for the Costa Book award.  In 2017 she judged the Bridport Prize flash fiction award.   Her acclaimed second novel ‘A Trick to Time’ was published in 2018.

Kit was born in Birmingham to an Irish mother and Caribbean father. She is generously funding five bursaries to enable low income or marginalised writers based in Birmingham or in Northern Ireland or the Republic of Ireland to submit their flash fiction stories to the 2019 competition free of charge.
Download T&Cs here.

Deadline for applications: Wednesday 23 May at 9am

Kit de waal

 

How to Edit with Purpose

Editing isn't simply a process of finessing. That is, of course, the final stage, but sometimes what can happen, especially in the context of writing competitions, is that a line-by-line perfectly serviceable submission comes in with few to no grammatical or syntactical errors - but it still lacks that special something that makes one take notice. Read more

Aki

 

 

 

 

New Password 

Forgotten your password? If you're having any problems with your password please contact victoria@bridportprize.org.uk and Victoria will send you another. 

 

Enter by Post

If you would prefer to send your entry by post, you can download a form for short stories, flash fiction and poems here

and download a postal entry form for novel entries here

We accept all submissions that are postmarked on or before 31 May even though they arrive in June. 

A category for everyone

Poetry Prize

poetry Competiton

“A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language”. W.H. Auden

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Short Story Prize

short story writing competition

“A short story must have a single mood and every sentence must build towards it.” Edgar Allan Poe

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The Peggy Chapman-Andrews Award for a First Novel

“There are no laws for the novel. There never have been, nor can there ever be.” Doris Lessing

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Flash Fiction Prize

Flash Fiction Prize

“Brevity is the sister of talent.” Anton Chekhov

Enter now

The day I got the email to say I had received a Highly Commended Prize for my poem from the Bridport Arts Centre was like finding the caramel sweet in the box of Cadbury’s Roses, after years of getting the slightly yucky orange, strawberry and coffee ones.

We decided to make hay while the sun shone and make the journey from Ireland to attend the prize-giving, we packed up Granny, 3 year old and husband and hit the sky and road early on the day of the big event. We were all so delighted we did, the lunch and presentations were just lovely, we were made to feel so welcome. It was a real treat to hear the judges and prizewinners speak and read from their work, forget the Roses we were having fancy posh chocolate now.

Maresa Sheehan, (Ireland) Highly Commended, poetry competition 2017

Meet the Judges

Naomi Wood
Hollie McNish
Kirsty Logan
Kirsty Logan
Read about our Judges

A Helping Hand

Writing tips

Sometimes the hardest thing is to find a starting point.

A selection of resources we hope you'll find useful.

In the news

Naomi Wood's room

"What to do with my free time. Read or clean. I don’t want to answer it every day with housework. I did not finish my third novel in between two kids by being house-proud". Naomi Wood, our First Novel Award judge ponders on the urge to tidy up versus getting on with some actual writing n this blog written specially for the Bridport Prize.

Kit de Waal

The first success I ever had with my writing was an Honorary Mention (note the capital letters) in the Fish Prize for Flash Fiction in 2014.  It was the first thing I’d ever sent out and getting an

Aki Schilz

Editing isn't simply a process of finessing. That is, of course, the final stage, but sometimes what can happen, especially in the context of writing competitions, is that a line-by-line perfectly serviceable submission comes in with few to no grammatical or syntactical errors - but it still lacks that special something that makes one take notice.

What now?

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